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 Puddledock Lane takes you west initially, past Sutton House (formerly the farm house of the Scutts and then the Popes). It then swings to the right, then left and left again, past an attractive group of Victorian cottages on the right and the old Dairy House on the left. This strange road layout is a remnant of a re-orientation of Puddledock Lane in early Victorian times; the road use to go to the north, rather than the south, of Sutton House.

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 The view to the north from Puddledock Lane, towards Plaisters Lane and the ridgeway beyond.

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 On the south side of Puddledock Lane is the Old Dairy House, which used to be the dairyman's house when Sutton Farm was part dairy. The Puddledocks, on the right here, was the site of the cattle sheds and dairy; houses have been built here to the same plan as the old farm buildings.

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 The view along Puddledock Lane, with one of the houses known collectively as "The Puddledocks" on the left.

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 Puddledock Lane then swings to the south, parallel with the stream. It was formerly known here as "Love Lane". Among the more recent houses, there are a couple of attractive old cottages, one being "The Cottage", shown here, on the east side of the lane, the other being Chipp's Cottage further on on the right.

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 The view to the east from Puddledock Lane, across the valley of the River Jordan, towards the houses along Sutton Road. The most prominent house here is "The Old Bakery", which was just what its name says.

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 The view to the east from Puddledock Lane, across the valley of the River Jordan, towards the houses along Sutton Road. The most prominent house here is "The Old Bakery", which was just what its name says.

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 Towards the southern end of Puddledock Lane, stands "The Malt House", and a terrace of attractive cottages set back from the road (and with no easy access), known as "Malt Villas". The cottages are conversions of an earlier malt-house, where locally grown barley was malted for beer.

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